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How to convert milliseconds to time in Excel?

As we all known, one second equals 1000 milliseconds between the time unites, this article, I will talk about how to convert milliseconds to hh:mm:ss time in Excel.

Convert milliseconds to hh:mm:ss time with formula


arrow blue right bubble Convert milliseconds to hh:mm:ss time with formula

To convert the milliseconds to time, the following formula can do you a favor:

Please enter this formula into the blank cell where you want to output the result:

=CONCATENATE(TEXT(INT(A2/1000)/86400,"hh:mm:ss"),".",A2-(INT(A2/1000)*1000)), and then drag the fill handle down to the cells that you want to apply this formula, and all milliseconds in the cells have been converted to time, see screenshot:

doc convert milliseconds to time 1


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  • To post as a guest, your comment is unpublished.
    Franciscan Punk · 3 months ago
    Let me rephrase that last question:
    "My question here is how do I right the equation so that any number of milliseconds less that 172,800,00 equals the right number of days?"

    I meant to type:

    My question here is how do I right the equation so that any number of milliseconds more than 172,799,999.00
    equals the right number of days?
  • To post as a guest, your comment is unpublished.
    Franciscan Punk · 3 months ago
    This is a very helpful discussion for me. I found Rob Bell's and Jan Hook's previous posts such a great help to the initial tutorial. I needed the additional "day" column to count out my milliseconds which were over the 84,000,000 per day. So I modified Robs easy equation to say, "=TEXT(A1/86400000,"dd:hh:mm:ss.000")." I also used Jan's second equation posted. Funny thing though, on google sheets, when I use the expression on 0ms, the result is 30:00:00:00.000, instead of 00:00:00:00.000. When I try the expression on 1ms, the result is 30:00:00:00.001, instead of 00:00:00:00.001. When I try the expression on 99999999ms, the result is 31:03:46:39.999. When I try the expression on 1111111111ms, the result is 11:20:38:31.111. Notice that all of these except the 1111111111ms begins with a "3", such as 2ms=30:00:00:00.2. It seems to me that strangely the expression "=TEXT(A1/86400000,"dd:hh:mm:ss.000"), and Jan's longer version both result in throwing off the math by exactly 30 days, until the 172,800,000ms, at which time the 30 days drops off, and the expression reports a result of 01:00:00:00.000.

    My question here is how do I right the equation so that any number of milliseconds less that 172,800,00 equals the right number of days?
  • To post as a guest, your comment is unpublished.
    Rob Bell · 4 months ago
    The simplest/ easiest expression to do this (based on Florian's post below) is =TEXT(A1/8400000,"hh:mm:ss.000")
  • To post as a guest, your comment is unpublished.
    Jan Hook · 11 months ago
    You can get the original formula to work by modifying the millisecond portion of the formula to include the text function to format as follows: =CONCATENATE(TEXT(INT(A1/1000)/86400,"hh:mm:ss"),".",TEXT(A1-(INT(A1/1000)*1000),"000"))
    If you need to allow for days you can do the following:
    =CONCATENATE(TEXT(INT(A1/1000)/86400,"dd:hh:mm:ss"),".",TEXT(A1-(INT(A1/1000)*1000),"000"))
  • To post as a guest, your comment is unpublished.
    Florian Betz · 1 years ago
    this produces some errors in some cases (I've not bothered to figure out why or in what cases, but it messed up in about 10% of my rows. Instead, divide the millisecond by 86400000, for example with

    =(A1/86400000)

    then apply a custom number format to the new value, such as:

    [hh]:mm:ss.000

    ..this worked fine for me in 100% of my rows.